Letters to the Editor 10/10/18
Oct 10, 2018 | 98 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Preserve our Paradise Editor: My family moved to the Heber Valley forty years ago, when I was eight. We came from the fast-growing suburbs of Denver, which I thought were a paradise at the time: out on the edge of the prairie there were miles and miles of new subdivisions with houses in various states of construction to wander through, soon-to-be pocket parks offered mounds of dirt for us to ride our bikes on, and fast food options promising happiness in their kid’s meals were popping up on all sides. It took me many years—and a move to an actual paradise—to realize that the appeal of that land was that I was there early in its transformation. Today Aurora, Colorado, is considered an undesirable part of Denver—it is crowded, unattractive, and crime-ridden. It is like so many other parts of this country that failed to balance its original appeal with any kind of vision for its future. This election year we have the opportunity to do more than hope our beautiful Heber Valley retains some of its appeal and charm. We have the chance to dedicate some actual resources toward keeping our open spaces open. The methods for doing so are not only economically sound, but they utilize the power of the market economy. They are fair to the landowners who elect to participate, they are realistic, and frankly they are very affordable when compared to the costs of development. I know many people living here who say they will move somewhere else when the valley loses its charm to over-development. But it isn’t too late to take a stand here, and now. We do have the right to speak up and help shape the future of our paradise. Driving from Heber to Midway, we can see that “gentlemen’s agreements” won’t be enough to preserve our open spaces—all it takes is a politician or two with a vested interest, or a friend to protect, to undermine them. No, we need actual money, actual tools, and the political will to preserve our paradise. The open space bonds for Wasatch County and for Midway City that have made it to the November ballot go a long way in doing just that. As someone who has seen the transformation of once-beautiful areas into typical suburbs of urban blight, I urge you to join me in voting YES on both. Matthew Heimburger Midway How Can We Save Midway’s Charm Editor: We got quite a shock at Midway's City Council meeting on 10/2/2018. Currently there are 305 new homes permitted for construction, with another 810 scrambling for building permits. Once all 1,115 new homes are completed, Midway's population will double. We are at the front end of a subdivision tsunami that could ruin Midway forever. Are we prepared for this small town to double in the next few years? Will Midway have any chance of retaining it's small town charm once the population has doubled? Can the Roads, Water systems, Sewer systems, and Schools keep up with this rapid growth? What can we do to save the Open Spaces? Voting FOR the Midway Special Bond is a crucial first step. If you figure 4 people per home, once all 1,115 new homes are built, Midway's population will increase by 4,460 new residents! It will double the population of Midway. There will be tremendous strains on infrastructure. Roads will be a major issue. Traffic congestion will become a big problem. We got our first traffic light last year. There will be many more. We will need multiple bonds for more Schools, more Water and Sewer, which will drive taxes up dramatically. We will have to endure years of construction, with torn up muddy roads, the endless "clack" of nail guns, and heavy construction trucks running day and night. Will all this rapid, unchecked growth change Midway forever? Yes it will. It will make us like all the other towns in UT that sold their soles to the endless development, strip malls, gas stations, convenience stores, and fast food joints. Midway and the Heber Valley are just too beautiful for that kind of unconstrained growth. Is this really what the citizens of Midway want? If you want to inject some sanity into this development chaos, then vote FOR the Midway Special Bond. It's time for the citizens of Midway to get involved with the future of their town. Go to City Hall and voice your opinion at the meetings. A year ago, hundreds of folks came to City Hall to protest a grotesque 695 unit storage facility that was going to be lit up 24/7 like a lunar landing site on Main Street in front of Memorial Hill. Thankfully, we got it defeated. The Midway Special Bond for Open Spaces is coming up in this election. Study after study across the country show that Open Space preservation ends up being much cheaper than subdivisions. So it makes great economic sense. Midway's economy has transitioned into a tourist economy. People here come to relax, not deal with traffic congestion and endless subdivisions. Preserving Open Space is crucial to Midway's economy. Preserving Open Space is crucial to maintaining Midway's small town charm. Vote FOR the Midway Special Bond. Midway is at a very critical junction. Either we speak up now or it will change in ways nobody will like. There are two groups, Pure Midway (www.puremidway.org) and the Open Space committee at Midway City need your help. Both of them are dedicated to a much more balanced approach to Midway's growth. They are not against growth, rather they want to see thoughtful, balanced growth done in a manor appropriate to Midway's needs. Engage with them. Come to their meetings and learn whats going on. Donate your time and money. Follow their results on Facebook. Register to vote and make your voices heard. Let's not wake up five years from now and wish we had done something. Together, our voices and actions can keep Midway a beautiful place. Jon McKeon Midway Important Local Ballot Issues Editor: Besides your usual candidate choices, there will be a few new issues to decide when you get your mail-out ballots around October 16th. If you recall in 2016, 74% of the voters denied a rezone in the North Fields. This year there are a couple of issues that are similar, or a direct result of that vote. There's Proposition 10 which is on your ballot because a group of citizens was successful in gathering signatures for a referendum petition this summer, so as to overturn a county council decision last May. They voted to amend our General Plan, which is the document to guide future county councils as our county grows. The council moved a major zoning boundary just for one landowner to get higher density. We have concerns with that decision. One, it moves the Central Planning Area boundary, which includes the North Fields, to allow a landowner to increase his density from 1 home per 20 acres (A-20) to 1 home per 5 acres (RA-5). That exception of the General Plan now encourages other landowners to ask for the same benefit. You can see where this is headed, more and more A-20 zoning may be converted to RA-5. Sounds like what we voted against in 2016, right? Just a little different mechanism by the council to change the zoning. Second, this council decision also introduces the RA-5 zone into the Central Planning Area, which the General Plan doesn't currently allow. So the rest of the Central Planning Area could get the 1 home per 5 acre zone in the North Fields. The councilmen who voted for this amendment say that we don't know what we're talking about and that they know better, but it's still not clear that they understand the gravity of their decision. The other decision for you to make is concerning the Wasatch County $10 million Open Space Bond. Since that 74% 2016 vote mentioned above, some citizens have been working towards securing grants and private donations to give willing landowners permanent conservation easements while they continue to own and maintain their property. All these grants and private donors require local seed money to show we have some skin in the game. That's where this Open Space Bond comes in, this money will be leveraged at least 2 or 3 times. The cost to taxpayers would only be $19.97 per YEAR on a $300K primary residence, or $36.30 per YEAR on a $300K commercial/ second home. This bond is a county-wide bond, all interested landowners can apply, but there is criteria to meet. There are also many checks and balances in the system, from a county advisory board, to the IRS and grant committees' requirements. The decision is yours. Whether this is affordable for you, whether we will have to pay increased future infrastructure and services taxes anyway for growth and if this bond could offset those, and whether you support permanently preserving these properties as part of a long term plan to protect our quality of life. Do you want less traffic, better air and water quality, and view sheds to be enjoyed for generations to come? If you would like more detailed information on both these issues and much more, go to WasatchTaxpayersAssociation.com and link to the 2018 Election page. We hope you will learn more about the permanent, long term consequences of these decisions before the ballots start arriving on October 16th. Tracy Taylor Heber City A Better Way Than a Bond and Debt for Midway Editor: $320,285 annually for 21 years. That is the amortized payment for a $5,000,000 bond at 3.5% interest that Midway will have to raise taxes for and pay each year if the $5 Million-dollar bond is fully utilized. In an era of tight budgets, can Midway afford this? The Midway budget is already strained. Some facts regarding this debt: Full term payout would be $6,725,985. At 5% interest it would be $373,118 annually. 3.5% for 15 years, the payment would be $402,910 annually. We all want open space but there are better ways to achieve it than this. For years we have been counseled to avoid debt, be wise, and live prudently within our means. One questionable feature of the proposed loan is that money can be withdrawn over a 10-year period. It is to be repaid over 21 years, potentially making it a 31-year ordeal. This bond in essence is writing a huge blank check. What if we have an emergency like an earthquake or a hillside fire or added taxes for a pending lawsuit, new High School, a Wasatch County Bond or any number of unforeseen expenditures? There is a fear that all the land in Midway is going to be developed. This isn’t the mindset of most landowners. The tax increase may be counterproductive to a lot of the landowners causing them to sell because they are taxed too much. We have a competent mayor and town council, city planners, and importantly, Courtland Nelson who chairs the Open Space committee. We can and will have open space without this bond. They will use other means to help preserve open space. There are better ways than putting a burden on the future generation to pay $320,0000 annually for 21 years. Lyle Gertsch Midway
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All or Nothing – Local Scout Beats Cancer, Then Completes All 138 Merit Badges
Oct 10, 2018 | 865 views | 0 0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Andrew Felsted
Andrew Felsted
slideshow
Special to the Wave Andrew Felsted of Heber City recently joined a very elite group. Over its 108-year history, its estimated that between 300-400 youth have earned all of the Boy Scouts of America’s merit badges. In 2014, after reading an article about a scout who had accomplished this, 12-year-old Andrew set the same goal. Nearly five years, thousands of hours, and 138 merit badges later; 17-year-old Felsted has earned every merit badge offered by BSA. The Boy Scouts of America currently offers 137 merit badges in areas ranging from art to farm mechanics, automotive maintenance to drafting and model design. Each merit badge is designed to teach and enrich the scout by providing a structure in which to learn about, explore, and develop a basic proficiency in the subject. Felsted earned all of the current merit badges, plus one-Computers-that has since been retired. “Andrew is an extraordinary young man; says one of his former Scout advisors Kimberly Gilboy. “He epitomizes the Scout Law as one who is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent. He had a pretty rough start in life, and used those experiences to become a very humble, compassionate, and determined young man,” Said Felsted’s former scoutmaster Adam Hicken, “Andrew does not have the words ‘Give Up or Quit’ in his vocabulary. Once he sets his mind on something he will not stop until he is finished or f... **For the full story, Subscribe to the Wave today
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Wave Legals 10/10/18
Oct 10, 2018 | 108 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
NOTICE NOTICE is hereby given that the WASATCH COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a SPECIAL WORK MEETING on October 25, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. in the Wasatch County Council Chambers, located at 25 North Main Street, Heber City. The meeting was requested by Heber Light and Power and Rocky Mountain Power to discuss a conditional use permit application with Wasatch County to rebuild and extend a transmission line and expand an existing substation. This work meeting is for discussion and presentation only. No action will be taken. The public may attend; however, it is anticipated that no public testimony will be heard. For information, please call the Planning Department at 435-657-3205. Pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act, individuals needing special accommodations during the meeting should notify the Wasatch County Planning Department prior to the meeting. S. Lawrence Wasatch County Planning & Zoning Published in The Wasatch Wave October 10, 2018. NOTICE OF LIEN SALE A public auction will be held on Saturday, October 27, 2018, at 11:00 a.m., located at Daniels Road Self Storage, 1670 South Daniels Road, Heber City, Utah, 84032. The contents of the following storage units will be sold or otherwise disposed of: A40 Crystal Beck Furniture, household items and clothing. F13 Griselda Tolley Mattress and frame, miscellaneous boxes. F52 Steven Stanley Commercial kitchen equipment, mobile shelving and snow thrower. G3 Suzanne Maierle Liese Wheel chair, Thule XT car roof container, child car seat, snowboards, skis and sleds, steel shelving, miscellaneous boxes and containers. M55 Isaac Goodrich Leather sofa and chair, desk, twin mattress and frame, dresser, metal cabinets. Published in The Wasatch Wave October 10, 17 and 24, 2018. PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the Midway Sanitation District on Wednesday, 24 October 2018, 6:00 p.m., at the Midway City Offices, 75 North 100 West, Midway, Utah. Time will be allowed for public comment on the following items: Tentative FY 2019 Budget/Public Hearing – The Adopted Fiscal Year 2019 Tentative Budget for Midway Sanitation District, Resolution 2018-08 A copy of the above item may be obtained from the District Office at 75 North 100 West, Midway (Midway City Office Building). Midway Sanitation District is happy to provide reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities. For assistance, please contact the Midway Sanitation District Clerk, Becky Wood at 654-3223 x104. Published in The Wasatch Wave October 10 and 17, 2018. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Notice is hereby given that public hearings will be held by the Midway City Council on Tuesday, 16 October 2018, 6:00 p.m., in the City Council Chambers, Midway Community Center, 160 West Main Street, Midway, Utah. Time will be allowed for public comment regarding the following items: Farm Springs Subdivision / Amendment – Discuss and possibly approve an amendment to the Farm Springs Subdivision located at 550 North Center Street (Zoning is R-1-15). Ordinance 2018-23 / General Plan Amendment – Discuss and possibly adopt Ordinance 2018-23 amending the Midway City General Plan regarding open space. Recommended by the Midway City Planning Commission. Copies of the above items may be obtained from the Midway City Recorder at 75 North 100 West, Midway (Midway City Office Building). Midway City is happy to provide reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities. For assistance, please contact the Midway City Recorder at 654-3223 x118. Published in The Wasatch Wave October 3 and 10, 2018. NOTICE TO WATER USERS The applications below were filed with the Division of Water Rights unless otherwise designated). These are informal proceedings per Rule R655-6-2. Protests concerning an application must be legibly written or typed, contain the name and mailing address of the protesting party, STATE THE APPLICATION NUMBER PROTESTED, CITE REASONS FOR THE PROTEST, and REQUEST A HEARING, if desired. Also, A $15 FEE MUST BE INCLUDED FOR EACH APPLICATION PROTESTED. Protests must be filed with the Division of Water Rights, PO Box 146300, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6300, or by hand delivery to a Division office during normal business hours on or before OCTOBER 30, 2018. Please visit waterrights.utah.gov or call (801)538-7240 for additional information. CHANGE APPLICATION(S) 55-12565(a44070): JGP Properties, Jared Parkinson, South Kamas Irrigation Company propose(s) using 3.98 ac-ft from groundwater (1.5 miles SW of Woodland) for IRRIGATION. Kent L. Jones, P.E. STATE ENGINEER Published in The Wasatch Wave October 3 and 10, 2018. ELECTION NOTICE To all qualified electors of Midway City, Utah: Take notice that on November 6, 2018 between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m., a special bond election (the “Bond Election”) will be held in Midway City, Utah (the “City”), in conjunction with the general election to be held that day. Information regarding polling places for each voting precinct, each early voting polling place, and each election day voting center, including changes to the location of a polling place and the location of an additional polling place, may be found at the Statewide Electronic Voter Information Website at www.vote.utah.gov or at the Wasatch County Clerk/Auditor’s Website at www.wasatch.utah.gov or at the Midway City Recorder’s Website at www.midwaycityut.org. To obtain information regarding the location of a polling place voters may also call the Wasatch County Clerk/Auditor at (435) 657-3190. The Election will be held for the purpose of submitting the following ballot proposition: OFFICIAL BALLOT PROPOSITION FOR THE MIDWAY CITY, UTAH SPECIAL BOND ELECTION NOVEMBER 6, 2018 /s/ Brad Wilson City Recorder PROPOSITION [fill in no.] Shall Midway City, Utah (the “City”), be authorized to issue General Obligation Bonds in an amount not to exceed Five Million Dollars ($5,000,000) (the “Bonds”) for the purpose of partnering with willing landowners, private organizations, land preservation foundations, governmental agencies and private donors, all at the discretion of the City Council, to pay all or a portion of the costs (to preserve open space (as open space is defined and is consistent with the Midway City General Plan and as permitted by the laws of the State of Utah) and related improvements, within the proposed annexation boundaries of the City as established in the land use map of the City dated December 13, 2017, including but not limited to acquisition of land, development rights, conservation easements, maintenance of use agreements, or related start-up expenses; said Bonds to be due and payable in not to exceed twenty-one (21) years from the date of issuance of the Bonds? Property Tax Cost of Bonds: If the Bonds are issued all at once an annual property tax to pay debt service on the Bonds will be required over a period of twenty-one (21) years in the estimated amount of $110.76 per year on a $440,000 residence and in the estimated amount of $201.39 per year on a business property having the same value. The foregoing information is only an estimate and is not a limit on the amount of taxes that the City may be required to levy in order to pay debt service on the Bonds. The City is obligated to levy taxes to the extent provided by law in order to pay the Bonds. The amounts are based on various assumptions and estimates, including estimated debt service on the Bonds and current taxable values of property in the City. FOR THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS (YES) AGAINST THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS (NO) Voting at the special bond election may be done by absentee ballot to be mailed to all registered voters in the City. Voters wishing to vote by absentee ballot and who fail to receive a ballot in the mail may contact the Wasatch County Clerk/Auditor’s office by phone at (435) 657-3190 or the Midway City Recorder’s office by phone at (435) 654-3223, ext. 118. Voters that do not wish to vote by mail (absentee ballot) may vote in person at the early voting places and during the early voting times established within the City for the general election on November 6, 2018, at the election day voting centers established within the City for the general election. Locations of early voting places and election day voting centers may be found by consulting the websites indicated above or by calling Wasatch County Clerk/Auditor’s office by phone at (435) 657-3190 or the Midway City Recorder’s office by phone at (435) 654-3223, ext. 118. NOTICE is given that on Tuesday, November 20, 2018, that being a day no sooner than seven (7) days and no later than fourteen (14) days after the Bond Election, the Council of the City will meet at its regular meeting place at 6:00 p.m. to canvass the returns and declare the results of the Bond Election. Pursuant to applicable provisions of Utah State law, the period allowed for any contest of the Bond Election shall end forty (40) days after November 20, 2018 (the date on which the returns of the Bond Election are to be canvassed and the results thereof declared). No such contest shall be maintained unless a complaint meeting the requirements of applicable law is filed with the Clerk of the District Court of Wasatch County within the prescribed forty (40) day period. GIVEN by order of the City Council of Midway City, Utah. By: /s/ Celeste T. Johnson Mayor ATTEST: By: /s/ Brad Wilson City Recorder Published in The Wasatch Wave October 3, 10 and 17, 2018. ELECTION NOTICE To all qualified electors of Wasatch County, Utah: Take notice that on November 6, 2018 between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m., a special bond election (the “Bond Election”) will be held in Wasatch County, Utah (the “County”), in conjunction with the general election to be held that day. Information regarding polling places for each voting precinct, each early voting polling place, and each election day voting center, including changes to the location of a polling place and the location of an additional polling place, may be found at the Statewide Electronic Voter Information Website at www.vote.utah.gov or at the Wasatch County Clerk/Auditor’s Website at www.wasatch.utah.gov. To obtain information regarding the location of a polling place voters may also call (435) 657-3190. The Election will be held for the purpose of submitting the following ballot proposition: OFFICIAL BALLOT PROPOSITION FOR THE WASATCH COUNTY, UTAH SPECIAL BOND ELECTION NOVEMBER 6, 2018 /s/ Brent Titcomb Clerk-Auditor PROPOSITION Shall Wasatch County, Utah (the “County”), be authorized to issue General Obligation Open Space Bonds in an amount not to exceed Ten Million Dollars ($10,000,000) for the purpose of paying all or a portion of the costs to acquire, preserve, or protect the permanent protection of open space within the County using all available land preservation tools, including but not limited to acquisition of land, development rights, conservation easements, maintenance of use agreements, or related operation, maintenance or start-up expenses; said Bonds to be due and payable in not to exceed thirty-one (31) years from the date of issuance of the Bonds? Property Tax Cost of Bonds: If the Bonds are issued (without regard to the currently planned issuance of Bonds in phases over time), an annual property tax to pay debt service on the Bonds will be required over a period of thirty-one (31) years in the estimated amount of $19.97 per year on a $300,000 residence and in the estimated amount of $36.30 per year on a business property having the same value. The foregoing information is only an estimate and is not a limit on the amount of taxes that the County may be required to levy in order to pay debt service on the Bonds. The County is obligated to levy taxes to the extent provided by law in order to pay the Bonds. The amounts are based on various assumptions and estimates, including estimated debt service on the Bonds and taxable values of property in the County. FOR THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS (YES) AGAINST THE ISSUANCE OF BONDS (NO) Voting at the special bond election may be done by absentee ballot. Voters wishing to vote by absentee ballot and who fail to receive a ballot in the mail may contact the Wasatch Clerk-Auditor’s office by phone at (435) 657-3190. Voters that do not wish to vote by absentee ballot may vote in person at the early voting places and during the early voting times established within the County for the general election or on November 6, 2018 at the election day voting centers established within the County for the general election. Locations of early voting places and election day voting centers may be found by consulting the websites above or by calling Wasatch Clerk-Auditor’s office by phone at (435) 657-3190. NOTICE is given that on Wednesday, November 14, 2018, that being a day no sooner than seven (7) days and no later than fourteen (14) days after the Bond Election, the Council of the County will meet at its regular meeting place at 3:00 p.m. to canvass the returns and declare the results of the Bond Election. Pursuant to applicable provisions of Utah State law, the period allowed for any contest of the Bond Election shall end forty (40) days after November 14, 2018 (the date on which the returns of the Bond Election are to be canvassed and the results thereof declared). No such contest shall be maintained unless a complaint meeting the requirements of applicable law is filed with the Clerk of the District Court of Wasatch County within the prescribed forty (40) day period. GIVEN by order of the County Council of Wasatch County, Utah. By: /s/ Greg McPhie Chair ATTEST: By: /s/ Brent Titcomb Clerk-Auditor Published in The Wasatch Wave October 3, 10 and 17, 2018. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, on the front steps of the Wasatch County Courthouse, at 1361 South Highway 40, Heber City, Utah 84032, on October 22, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a Trust Deed and Security Agreement with Assignment of Rents executed by Kenneth Patey and Richelle Patey (“Pateys”) as Trustors, in favor of Moss Law Offices, PC, as Beneficiary, and recorded on August 23, 2013, as Entry No. 393192, Book 1088, Pages 1716-1724 in the official records of Wasatch County Recorder, and as corrected by the Affidavit of Scrivener’s Error recorded on June 7, 2018, as Entry No. 452476, Book 1225, Pages 20-21, covering real property located in Wasatch County, Utah, and more particularly described as follows: PARCEL NUMBER: 00-0007-5346; OWC-0342-0-028-034 Beginning 2.50 chains North of the Southeast corner of the Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of Section 28, Township 3 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian, thence North 7.50 chains; thence West 20 chains; thence South 7.50 chains; thence East 20 chains to the beginning. Said Parcel being more accurately depicted in that Record of Survey Map prepared by Brent E. Christensen, PLS #4854808 and filed in the office of the surveyor, Wasatch County, State of Utah, on the 23rd of December, 2008, as Record of Survey Filing Number 2085, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a found Wasatch State Park boundary marker as depicted on the certain Record of Survey Map prepared by Glen B. Hatch (Miller Associates, Inc.) and filed in the office of surveyor, Wasatch County, State of Utah, on the 17th of September, 1997, as Record of Survey Map Filing Number 674, said Wasatch State Park Boundary Marker lying South 645.17 feet and East 2,433.27 feet from a Wasatch County Survey Monument for the Northwest corner of Section 28, Township 3 South, Range 4 East, Salt Lake Base and Meridian (Basis of Bearings: Utah Coordinate System 1983 Central Zone); and running thence North 89°58’40” East 1,320.85 feet to a found Wasatch State Park Boundary Marker as depicted on said Record of Survey Filing Number 674; thence South 00°15’38” East 496.51 feet to a found Wasatch State Park Boundary Marker as depicted on said Record of Survey Filing Number 674; thence South 89°59’38” West 1,323.45 feet, as depicted on said Record of Survey Filing Number 674; thence North 00°02’28” East 496.14 feet, as depicted on said Record of Survey Filing Number 674, to the point of beginning. Approximately 15 Acres. Together with all appurtenances and 10 shares of stock of Oak Haven Mutual Water Users Association, Inc. in the possession of Pateys, together with all of the following property, whether now existing, or hereafter arising: all buildings, structures, and other improvements of every nature whatsoever now or at any time hereafter constructed or situated on said land owned by Pateys and now or hereafter located on, attached to, or used in connection with the operation or maintenance of such land, buildings, structures, or other improvements, including all replacements of any of the foregoing and any and all additions thereto; all rights-of-way, easements, gores of land, and licenses relating or appurtenant to said land; all water rights and stock; all mineral, oil, and gas rights and profits; all rents, issues, profits, and income of whatever nature of and from the foregoing; all right, title, and interest of Pateys in and to any and all present and future leases of said land or space in any building erected thereon, including the right to receive rent; all tenements, hereditaments, rights, privileges, and appurtenances relating or belonging to the foregoing; all awards made for the taking by eminent domain or by any proceeding or purchase in lieu thereof of the foregoing or any portion thereof; and all proceeds of insurance paid on account of any partial or total destruction of the foregoing. All of the foregoing land and property is hereinafter referred to as the “Property.” The Property is limited to the 10 shares of stock of Oak Haven Mutual Water Users Association, Inc., and all other water rights are reserved to Pateys. The Property specifically excludes any livestock and farm related equipment for any livestock maintained on the Property. The Property is subject to all existing trails, roads and easements. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed is Duane W. Moss, and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default are Kenneth C. Patey and Richelle C. Patey. William O. Kimball was appointed successor trustee on June 7, 2018 (recorded on June 19, 2018), and is the current successor trustee. Pursuant to the provisions of Utah Code Annotated 57-1 -27 et seq., any person, including the beneficiary, may bid at the sale. The undersigned trustee may bid for the beneficiary at the sale. Each bid shall be considered to be an irrevocable offer. Any successful bidder who refuses to pay the bid price shall be liable for any loss occasioned by the refusal, including interest, costs and trustee’s and reasonable attorney’s fees. All bidders, except the beneficiary, must pre-qualify by tendering to the successor trustee a $5,000.00 deposit before the bidding begins. Except for the successful bidder, all deposits will be returned at the conclusion of the bidding. The successful bidder’s deposit will be immediately applied to the purchase price, and the successful bidder must tender to the successor trustee the balance of the purchase price by 11:00 a.m. on the seventh calendar day following the trustee’s sale. Both the deposit and the balance must be paid to PIA ANDERSON MOSS HOYT in the form of a wire transfer, cashier’s check or certified funds. Cash payments, personal checks or trust checks are not accepted. The Successor Trustee may be contacted regarding this notice during regular business hours in a regular business day at the address or phone number listed below. Dated this 26th day of September, 2018. /s/William O. Kimball, Successor Trustee PIA ANDERSON MOSS HOYT 136 E. South Temple, Suite 1900 Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 (801) 350-9000 Published in The Wasatch Wave September 26, and October 3 and 10, 2018.
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Lady Wasps tennis finishes well at state
Oct 10, 2018 | 102 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
There were 24 teams that played in the state championship this year. If you count all the ties then Wasatch finished 5th. By not reaching our seed in regions hurt us because we ended up playing the top seed in state in the second round in most cases. The hardest part about state is you have the big crowds from both sides cheering and it certainly provides an opportunity for nerves to come into play. We played our first match at Salt Lake Tennis Club because of rain. Then the matches were switched over to Eccles Center at the University of Utah. The semifinals were then back to Liberty Park. Tennis is a game where you can be on fire one round or even one game the next can be totally the opposite. #1 Singles Alysha Damron played a girl from Farmington in the first round. Alysha played really well and she won 6/1 & 6/2. The second round was played against Emily Astle from Alta. Astle has won the state championship three straight years and going for #4. In fact, she did win this again and next year heading to BYU on a full ride scholarship. Alysha had many chance to hold serve just was not able to overcome the power and consistency of her opponent. #2 Singles Phelan O’Keefe played a girl from Brighton. Phelan played really well against a girl she played earlier in the year. Phelan had a lot of long games and points but won 6/3 & 6/1. Next round wa... **For the Full Story, subscribe to the Wave today
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Lady seniors finish with heart
Oct 10, 2018 | 113 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The 2018 girl’s soccer season came to a close for the Lady Wasps of Wasatch last Tuesday night. Playing their finale under the lights on the turf at Wright-Tree Stadium, which has become a school tradition for both the girls and boys teams, Wasatch lost to Maple mountain 2-0. It was a difficult season for the Lady Wasps as they recorded a total of just five wins against 11 losses. Three of their five victories were in region play, however, which was a positive for the fifth place team. Wasatch played with tremendous heart in its final game of the season, holding the Golden Eagles scoreless until nearly midway through the second period.... ** For the full story, subscribe to the Wasatch Wave
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